Do you have something to hold on to, something to motivate you, something to inspire you?

“To succeed, you need to find something to hold on to, something to motivate you, something to inspire you.”

Tony Dorsett

Flying

Do you have something to hold on to, something to motivate you, something to inspire you?

ENDS


Image from http://emergeinspired.com

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Leverage Diversity for Greater Success

From http://thefutureleadershipinitiative.wordpress.com

As Adam Vaccaro points out, diverse workplace might ultimately create better results, as some new studies suggest.

“The study, detailed by NPR, looks at the work of scientific researchers and finds that papers written by multicultural teams were cited in other research more often than those written by homogenous groups. In the world of research, citations are seen as a metric of quality.

Ethnic diversity wasn’t the only harbinger of success. The same study also found that groups with members from geographic areas-perhaps three cities in the same country-also created better papers than those with members from the same place.

“It’s a matter of looking at individual teams and making sure they’re different perspectives, different points of view, different backgrounds,” NPR’s David Greene says.

The principle isn’t an entirely new one. The idea that different perspectives result in better work has been explored from a more macro-economic perspective, as research shows that diverse cities experience more economic growth. The idea is also at play in research showing that companies with females on their boards financially outperform those that don’t (have females on their boards).

From http://www.meritor.com

People tend to think of diversity as simply demographic, a matter of color, gender, or age. However, groups can be disparate in many ways. Diversity is also based on informational differences, reflecting a person’s education and experience, as well as on values or goals that can influence what one perceives to be the mission of something as small as a single meeting or as large as a whole company.

Diversity among employees can create better performance when it comes to out-of-the-ordinary creative tasks such as product development or cracking new markets… The researchers found that informational diversity stirred constructive conflict, or debate, around the task at hand. That is, people deliberate about the best course of action.

Diversity is the crucial element for group creativity. Innovation teams tasked with creating new products or technologies or iterating existing ones need tension to produce breakthroughs, and tension comes from diverse points of view. This is the opposite of groupthink, the creativity-killing phenomenon of too much agreement and too similar perspectives that often paralyzes otherwise great teams.

From http://www.nissan-global.com

 According to McKinsey Quarterly, between 2008 and 2010, companies with more diverse top teams were also top financial performers. That’s probably no coincidence. There are many reasons companies with more diverse executive teams should outperform their peers: fielding a team of top executives with varied cultural backgrounds and life experiences can broaden a company’s strategic perspective, for example. And relentless competition for the best people should reward organizations that cast their nets beyond traditional talent pools for leadership.

Leverage Diversity for Greater Success

😉

THE END

Blogging for authenticity in the world of fake smiles

From https://psyport.files.wordpress.com

We long for acceptance, love, and connection. But often we don’t know how to create it in the world full of fake smiles and empty greetings. In the world of sweet dreams where everybody’s looking for something…


I think this longing for authentic communication is what drives people to blogging, both as bloggers and as readers.

In the blogosphere, we do not know each other personally, so we don’t get distracted with the usual ‘surface’ features like age, gender, social-economic status, ethnicity and therefore don’t get blinded by the usual stereotypes and prejudices. We can take off the mask and be more real and genuine without fear of repercussions.

From http://www.tribal-truth.com

 The creative side of blogging also gives us plenty of room for exploration. Like writers, getting in the ‘skin’ of different characters in their books, we can explore how we might have felt if…, or what we might have done if… We can move away from the logic of the everyday routine life and let our imagination roam free.

From http://lawofattractionatoz.com

 What is so special for you in writing blogs?

Or why do you keep reading?

 

THE END

Clock this: One can do good in any field of endeavor

“One can do good in any field of endeavor.”

( from ‘A writer’s Diary’ by Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1876 )

Trevor Baylis OBE - Supporter of The Climate Change Challenge
From http://www.climatechangechallenge.org/

Clock this: My life as an inventor
by Trevor Baylis

(excerpts)

“Our factory in Cape Town opened in 1995… The words BayGeb Power Manufacturing blared out from a white board in bright-blue lettering three feet high. BayGen is short for Baylis Generators and it was the first time I’d had my name emblazoned on anything…

I had been party to all the plans and knew we were setting up a multi-racial factory employing people of different abilities. But none of our discussions had prepared me for the emotion of seeing our grand plan in action. On the same production line were people of all colours and talents. It was a totally integrated workplace – black, white, brown, male, female, English, Afrikaans, Xhosa… The limbless working next to the blind, deaf people in partnership with the able-bodied, wheelchairs and crutches among the benches, the feeble co-operating with the strong…

It was very humbling. The girl smiling at me there is blind. The bloke sitting at the bench – deaf. Those two guys pushing the heavy trolley have only got two legs between them…

All of them worked with rhythmic precision, chatting and laughing. A few singing along to a Freeplay radio (the name we gave to clockwork radio)…

The factory is partly owned by Disability Employment Concerns, an agency sponsored by the Liberty Life Foundation. They are responsible for training the 35% of the workforce who have handicaps. All the workers – able-bodied and disabled – earn the same and their rates compare well with other factories…

As I walked along the line and chatted to the people making the radios I was overwhelmed by their warmth towards me. “This is the first job I’ve had since I lost my arm,” said one young man clasping my hand in his. “I can go one better,” said the blind girl sitting next to him. “This is the first time anyone ever employed me”…

Walking around the plant was like a tonic. People in Africa have a wonderful capacity for laughter and enjoyment, whatever they are doing. In Britain, we may be better off, but our lives seem harsher and more embittered by comparison. There was more undistilled delight there that morning than I’d met in a long time, and for me it was a reawakening.”

From http://ashleaturner.blogspot.co.nz/

The Clockwork Radio
created by Trevor Baylis

This extremely clever ‘wind-up radio’ was developed by the British inventor ‘Trevor Baylis’ for Third World countries where affordable energy is scarce or non-exsistent. This radio uses no batteries and does not need any electricity to run it. It is powered by an internal clockwork generator, which when fully wound up provides enough electricity for long periods.

The clockwork product is not a new invention. The Victorians used this mechanical system quite extensively. Their clockwork toys incorporated this mechanism. What is innovative is the way in which ‘Baylis’ has used this simple but effective means of creating electricity to both help the people of the Third World and to develop a product which is selling extensively in Western Europe.

The radio has been personally endorsed by Nelson Mandella.

Photo courtesy of Freeplay FoundationFrom http://cuso-vso.netfirms.com

THE END