Laughter is the best medicine…

Laughter the best medicine1From The Green Mechanics

As the saying goes, “Laughter is the best medicine but if you laugh for no reason, you need medicine.” So here is a cute short video with laughing babies to give you a good reason for finishing your weekend and starting your week with a hearty laughter. Enjoy 🙂

Advertisements

Blessed are the weird people, poets, misfits, writers, mystics, painters, troubadours for they teach us to see the world through different eyes

BlessedFrom leilaworldblog

I would also add philosophers, dreamers, dancers, singers, bloggers, and photographers to this list 🙂

Talking about photographers, last week I came across an amazing 14-year-old photographer. Enjoyed a lot looking at the world through his eyes and creative imagination. Check out his incredible self-portraits.

photomanipulations-self-portraits-zev-fiddle-oak-2From Incredible Self Portraits by 14-Year-Old Photographer

THE END

Warriors are not what you think of as warriors…

Warrior hippie peaceFrom Hippie Peace Freaks

“Warriors are not what you think of as warriors. The warrior is not someone who fights, because no one has the right to take another life. The warrior, for us, is one who sacrifices himself for the good of others. His task is to take care of the elderly, the defenseless, those who can not provide for themselves, and above all, the children, the future of humanity.”

Sitting Bull

My father didn’t tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it…

FatherFrom Facebook Covers

Today I watched one of the best movies I’ve ever seen called The Pursuit of Happyness. This film is based on Chris Gardner’s nearly one-year struggle with homelessness described in his memoir with the same title. At the age of twenty, Chris Gardner, just out of the Navy, arrived in San Francisco to pursue a promising career in medicine. Considered a prodigy in scientific research, he surprised everyone and himself by setting his sights on the competitive world of high finance. Yet no sooner had he landed an entry-level position at a prestigious firm than Gardner found himself caught in a web of incredibly challenging circumstances that left him as part of the city’s working homeless and with a toddler son. Motivated by the promise he made to himself as a fatherless child to never abandon his own children, the two spent almost a year moving among shelters, “HO-tels,” soup lines, and even sleeping in the public restroom of a subway station. Never giving in to despair, Gardner made an astonishing transformation from being part of the city’s invisible poor to being a powerful player in its financial district.

Loved this inspirational story of an amazing man who went through lots of hardships in life but never lost hope, never gave up and never abandoned his child.

I’ve met such man once in my life when I was working in an orphanage. He lost his wife and was left alone with 3 little children during the most turbulent period in Russia after the collapse of the USSR. He was working on a factory, but was paid nothing for 5 months. He had no money to feed his children, therefore he brought them to the orphanage so that they could get some food and clothes. He joined our orphanage as well as a night-time supervisor to stay close to his children. For a few months he kept working on a factory during the day while staying at the orphanage during the night, supervising children. As soon as he could, he took his children back home. Truly amazing man. Hope his children appreciate his hard work and caring heart…

Let’s honor such humble unsung heros who are working very hard to make this world a better place for their children.

What is your most valued possession?

QuoteFrom Tennessee Office for Refugees

Today I came across a beautiful article  Portraits of Refugees Posing With Their Most Valued Possessions with the most amazing images of human love and care I’ve ever seen. These images were created by Brian Sokol – a very talented photographer with an eye as sensitive to human pain and suffring as his heart:

sudan-6-copy

 “The most important object Dowla was able to bring with her is the wooden pole balanced over her shoulder, with which she carried her six children during the 10-day journey from Gabanit to South Sudan. At times, the children were too tired to walk, forcing her to carry two on either side.”

sudan-5-copy

“The most important thing that Shari was able to bring with her is the stick she holds. “I’ve had this stick since I went blind six years ago, she said. My son led me along the road with it. Without it, and him, I would be dead now.”

If you had to quickly flee both your home and country, what one possession would you make sure you take with you?

THE END