True power is to EMPOWER!

“Leadership is about making others better as a result of your presence and making sure that impact lasts in our absence.”

Sheryl Sandberg

"Leadership is about making others better as a result of your presence and making sure that impact lasts in our absence." — Sheryl Sandberg

True leaders become great not because of their power, but because of their ability to empower others. In fact, true leaders do not even need to have power in a political or career sense. We all have potential to be leaders, no matter how high we are on the political or career ladder, no matter what path we chose in our lives.

If your words and actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, discover and reach their potential, you are a leader.

True power is to EMPOWER!

😉

THE END

Image from http://www.popsugar.com/

Let’s look for way forward, not who to blame…

From http://off-campus.weebly.com/

As Michael Straczynski once said, “People spend too much time finding other people to blame, too much energy finding excuses for not being what they are capable of being, and not enough energy putting themselves on the line, growing out of the past, and getting on with their lives.”

Considering this general tendency, it does not come as a surprise when we see men being blamed for all problems affecting women.

image

From http://terry73.wordpress.com

Women do have lots of problems. As Sheryl Sandberg points out in her book Lean In, “the blunt truth is that men still run the world. This means that when it comes to making the decision that most affect us all, women’s voices are not heard equally…”

There are lots of reasons for this. “Women face real obstacles in the professional world, including blatant and subtle sexism… Too few workplaces offer the flexibility and access to child care and parental leave that are necessary for pursuing a career while raising children…”

Embedded image permalink

From https://twitter.com/workingmothers1

As the result, the whole society suffers: “The laws of economics and many studies of diversity tell us that if we tapped the entire pool of human resources and talent, our collective performance would improve. Legendary investor Warren Buffett has stated generously that one of the reasons for his great success was that he was competing with only half of the population. The Warren Buffetts of my generation are still largely enjoying this advantage. When more people get in the race, more records will be broken. And the achievements will extend beyond those individuals to benefit us all.”

Men in a boardroomFrom http://www.wemadeit.ca

When asked how American women could help those who experienced the horrors and mass rapes of war in places like Liberia, Leymah Gbowee (Liberian peace activist who won the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize) responded with four simple words: “More women in power.” We do need more strong women in power who don’t play victim, who don’t make themselves look pitiful, who don’t point fingers but stand firmly and deal with the problems.

Quote

From http://www.pinterest.com

We do need more women in leadership roles to improve conditions not only for all women and children, but for men as well.

“Why improving conditions for men?” one may ask.

As Sheryl Sandberg points out. “Today, despite all of the gains we have made, neither men nor women have real choice. Until women have supportive employers and colleagues as well as partners who share family responsibilities, they don’t have real choice. And until men are fully respected for contributing inside the home, they don’t have real choice either. Equal opportunity is not equal unless everyone receives the encouragement that makes seizing those opportunities possible. Only then can both men and women achieve their full potential. …

We all want the same thing: to feel comfortable with our choices and to feel validated by those around us. If more children see fathers at school pickups and mothers who are busy at jobs, both girls and boys will envision more options for themselves. Expectations will not be set by gender but by personal passion, talents, and interests.”

From http://cdn2.thegrindstone.com

Like Sheryl Sandberg, I hope my children will be able to choose what to do with their lives without external or internal obstacles slowing them down or making them question their choices. If they want to do the important work of raising children full-time, I hope they will be respected and supported by the society disregarding their gender. If they want to work full-time and pursue their professional aspirations, I hope they will also be respected and supported by the society disregarding their gender.

From http://d.gr-assets.com/

Let’s look for way forward, not who to blame…

😉

THE END

Leverage Diversity for Greater Success

From http://thefutureleadershipinitiative.wordpress.com

As Adam Vaccaro points out, diverse workplace might ultimately create better results, as some new studies suggest.

“The study, detailed by NPR, looks at the work of scientific researchers and finds that papers written by multicultural teams were cited in other research more often than those written by homogenous groups. In the world of research, citations are seen as a metric of quality.

Ethnic diversity wasn’t the only harbinger of success. The same study also found that groups with members from geographic areas-perhaps three cities in the same country-also created better papers than those with members from the same place.

“It’s a matter of looking at individual teams and making sure they’re different perspectives, different points of view, different backgrounds,” NPR’s David Greene says.

The principle isn’t an entirely new one. The idea that different perspectives result in better work has been explored from a more macro-economic perspective, as research shows that diverse cities experience more economic growth. The idea is also at play in research showing that companies with females on their boards financially outperform those that don’t (have females on their boards).

From http://www.meritor.com

People tend to think of diversity as simply demographic, a matter of color, gender, or age. However, groups can be disparate in many ways. Diversity is also based on informational differences, reflecting a person’s education and experience, as well as on values or goals that can influence what one perceives to be the mission of something as small as a single meeting or as large as a whole company.

Diversity among employees can create better performance when it comes to out-of-the-ordinary creative tasks such as product development or cracking new markets… The researchers found that informational diversity stirred constructive conflict, or debate, around the task at hand. That is, people deliberate about the best course of action.

Diversity is the crucial element for group creativity. Innovation teams tasked with creating new products or technologies or iterating existing ones need tension to produce breakthroughs, and tension comes from diverse points of view. This is the opposite of groupthink, the creativity-killing phenomenon of too much agreement and too similar perspectives that often paralyzes otherwise great teams.

From http://www.nissan-global.com

 According to McKinsey Quarterly, between 2008 and 2010, companies with more diverse top teams were also top financial performers. That’s probably no coincidence. There are many reasons companies with more diverse executive teams should outperform their peers: fielding a team of top executives with varied cultural backgrounds and life experiences can broaden a company’s strategic perspective, for example. And relentless competition for the best people should reward organizations that cast their nets beyond traditional talent pools for leadership.

Leverage Diversity for Greater Success

😉

THE END

Authentic Communication

From http://hr.toolbox.com

 Authentic communication is not always easy, but it is the basis of successful relationships at home and real effectiveness at work. Yet people constantly back away from honesty to protect themselves and others.

As Sheryl Sandberg points out, this reticence causes and perpetuates all kinds of problems: uncomfortable issues that never get addressed, resentment that builds, unfit managers who get promoted rather than fired, and on and on. Often these situations don’t improve because no one tells anyone what is really happening. We are so rarely brave enough to tell the truth…

From The Grumpy Poet

However, authentic communication is not simply about saying what we think at all costs. Communication works best when we combine appropriateness with authenticity, finding the sweet spot where opinions are not brutally honest but delicately honest. Speaking truth fully without hurting feelings comes naturally to some and is an acquired skill for others.

 From http://vinylzart.com

Communicaid identifies the following key elements of authentic communication:

  • Take responsibility for your communication and this means not only for what you say but also ensuring it has been fully understood.  You need to have ownership of the message and be responsible for any fall-out or negative response.
  • Be clear in your use of language so that you are not misinterpreted.  Avoid ambiguous language and technical or specialist jargon that may not be understood.
  • Tell the truth – make sure your facts are accurate and don’t make false promises or leave people to make assumptions that are misplaced.  Also be wary of not making promises that you will not be able to deliver on.
  • Don’t over-generalise or make sweeping statements such as, ‘Nobody thinks it’s a good idea’ or ‘This always happens’.
  • Work with the facts and be aware of the difference between your subjective opinions and the objective facts.  Avoid second guessing and making assumptions about what others are feeling, thinking or meaning.  If in doubt, ask for clarification.
  • Build a connection with the people you are communicating with.  Show them that you care and are interested in them.
  • Be consistent both in what you say but also how you follow up.  Your words should match your actions and you should always endeavour to do what you say you will do within the timeframe you have promised
  • Create mutual understanding by being prepared to share a little bit about yourself and by being curious about others.  Empathise with other perspectives and always try to imagine yourself in the others’ shoes.
  • Build your self-awareness and keep learning about yourself.  Be aware of your own judgements and prejudices and the obstacles that prevent you from communicating authentically.  Monitor your own negative responses and learn to manage your reactions to certain triggers.

From http://www.webbstar.net

In addition to creating better relationships, building trust, managing conflict more effectively and improving team spirit, authenticity helps to create happier, more self-confident and open individuals.

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Greatness is not measured by Money or Stature. It is measured by Courage and Heart.

Leo The Lion, "...measured not by money and stature, but courage and heart."

From http://www.pinterest.com

“You remember the cowardly lion from The Wizard of Oz don’t you?  He was supposed to be the king of the jungle but he had no courage.

Sadly, I see this missing in much leadership today. Let’s face it.  Leading others is hard. There is often loneliness to leadership.  Leadership takes great courage.

Here are some characteristics of cowardly leadership:

1. Says “I’ll think about it” rather than “No”…even when no is already the decided answer…

2. Avoids conflict…even when it is necessary for the good of relationships and the organization…

3. Never willing to make the hard decisions…

4. Pretends everything is okay…even when it’s not…

5. Bails on the team when things become difficult…”

By Ron Edmondson

 

headinsand
From Unconventional Leadership

What would you add to this list?

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Are YOU a LEADER?


From http://truewhisper.com

Who has impacted your life in a big way?

Whose life have you impacted in a big way?

We have all changed someone’s life – usually without even realizing it. In this funny talk, Drew Dudley calls on all of us to celebrate leadership as the everyday act of improving each other’s lives. We all have potential to be leaders.

Are you a LEADER?

THE END

Are You a Genius or a Genius Maker?

From http://naomisimson.com

 We’ve all had experience with two dramatically different types of leaders. The first type drain intelligence, energy, and capability from the ones around them and always need to be the smartest ones in the room. These are the idea killers, the energy sappers, the diminishers of talent and commitment.

On the other side of the spectrum are leaders who use their intelligence to amplify the smarts and capabilities of the people around them. When these leaders walk into a room, lightbulbs go off over people’s heads, ideas flow, and problems get resolved. These are the leaders who inspire employees to stretch themselves to deliver results that surpass expectations. These are the Multipliers.

 


From http://multipliersbooks.com

Multipliers are genius makers. Everyone around them gets smarter and more capable. People may not become geniuses in a traditional sense, but Multipliers invoke each person’s unique intelligence and create an atmosphere of genius – innovation, productive effort, and collective, viral intelligence.

Diminishers on the other hand are absorbed in their own intelligence, stifle others, and deplete the organization of crucial intelligence and capability.

Accidental_Diminisher_Chart_Twitter_Version
From http://multipliersbooks.com

The mind of Multiplier

Multipliers and Diminishers tend to hold radically different assumptions about the intelligence of the people they work with. These assumptions appear to explain much of the difference in how Diminishers and Multipliers operate.

The Diminisher’s view of intelligence is based on elitism and scarcity. Diminishers appear to believe that really intelligent people are a rare breed and I am one of the few really smart people. They then conclude, other people will never figure things out without me.

Multipliers on the other hand have a rich view of the intelligence of the people around them. They see intelligence as continually developing. Therefore their key assumption: people are smart. They will figure this out and will get even smarter in the process.

From http://kellysopeningworld.wordpress.com/

In analysing data from more than 150 leaders, Wiseman and McKeown have identified five key disciplines that distinguish Multipliers from Diminishers:

  1. The Talent Magnet: Attract and optimize talent
  2. The Liberator: Create intensity that requires best thinking
  3. The Challenger: Extend challenges
  4. The Debate Maker: Debate decisions
  5. The Investor: Instill ownership and accountability

Multiplier
From http://www.monkeymagic.net/2013/07/

* * *

1

The Talent Magnet


From http://izquotes.com

Talent Magnets get access to the best talent because people flock to work for them knowing they will be fully utilized and developed to be ready for the next stage. Talent Magnets:

  • Appreciate all types of genius: genius comes in many forms. Some minds excel at quantitative analysis or verbal reasoning – capabilities measured through IQ and other tests of traditional cognitive intelligence. Other minds offer creative genius, innovating through fresh thinking and bold ideas. Some minds are critical, spotting every problem or landmine lurking within a plan; the genius of some others is to find a way to tunnel around these landmines.
  • Ignore boundaries: Talent Magnets live in a world without walls and without hierarchical or lateral restrictions. Instead, they see talent networks.
  • Find people’s native genius: A native genius is something that people do, not only exceptionally well, but absolutely naturally. They do it easily (without extra effort) and freely (without condition). It is something that gives them inherent satisfaction, and they offer their capability voluntarily, even ardently. Native genius can be so instinctive for people that they may not even understand their own capability, like the fish that discovers the water last. By telling people what you see, Talent Magents can raise their awareness and confidence, allowing them to provide their capability more fully.
  • Utilize people to their fullest by connecting people with opportunities that allow them to be used at their highest point of contribution.

From http://www.chopcow.com

* * *

2

The Liberator

From http://wwwawesomequotes.blogspot.co.nz/

Liberators create an intense environment that requires people’s best thinking and work. As a result, people offer their best and boldest thinking and give their best effort.

Liberators:

  • Release others by restraining themselves: it is a small victory to create space for others to contribute. But it is a huge victory to maintain that space and resist the temptation to jump back in and consume it yourself.
  • Shift the ratio of listening to talking: liberators are ferocious listeners who listen to feed their hunger for knowledge.
  • Operate consistently: The consistency in the liberator’s actions establishes a predictable pattern of behaviour. This allows others to know when it is their turn and where there is space for them to contribute. It also creates safety with all people knowing what to expect.
  • Level the playing field: in any formal organization, the playing field is rarely level, and certain voices are inherently advantaged. These include senior executives. Unless managed, other voices that are perhaps closest to the real issues can become muffled.
  • Demand best work: Asking whether people are giving their best gives them the opportunity to push themselves beyond their previous limits.
  • Distinguish best work from outcomes: people feel positive pressure when they are held to their best work, however it is important to avoid creating stress by holding people accountable for outcomes beyond their control.
  • Generate rapid learning cycles by admitting and sharing mistakes and insisting on learning from mistakes.


From http://www.mindwerx.com

* * *

3

The Challenger

From http://ieet.org

Challengers define opportunities that challenge people to go beyond what they know how to do. As a result they get an organisation that understands the challenge and has the focus and energy to take it on.

The Challengers:

  • Seed the opportunity by allowing people to discover it, challenging the assumptions, re-framing the problems into opportunities, and providing the starting point.
  • Lay down a challenge by asking the hard questions and letting others to fill in the blanks.
  • Generate belief in what is possible by laying out a path, co-creating the plan and beginning with small early wins.

From http://www.notable-quotes.com

* * *

4

The Debate Maker

From http://www.savemarinwood.org

Debate Makers engage people in debating the issues up front, which leads to sound decisions that people understand and can execute efficiently.

Debate Makers:

  • Frame the issue by defining the question that unearths and challenges the assumptions entrenched in the organization, forming the team, and assembling the required data.
  • Spark the debate by creating safe environment for best thinking and demanding rigor.
  • Drive sound decision making.

From http://www.freshbooks.com

* * *

5

The Investor

From http://quotespictures.net

Multipliers operate as Investors. They invest by infusing others with the resources and ownership they need to produce results independent of the leader.

The Investors:

  • Define ownership by naming the lead, giving ownership for the end goal and stretching the role
  • Invest resources by providing mentoring, coaching and backup
  • Hold people accountable

 
From http://www.nwlink.com/

Multipliers also tend to have a great sense of humor. They aren’t necessarily comedians, but they don’t take themselves or situations too seriously. They can laugh at themselves and see comedy in error and in life’s foibles. Their sense of humor liberates others. Multipliers use humor to create comfort and to spark a natural energy and intelligence in others.

 From “Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter” by Liz Wiseman with Greg McKeown

 From http://izquotes.com/

The concept of Diminishers and Multipliers however is not limited to business leadership only. It can be easily applied to any relationship, including marriage, family, parenting, friendship etc.


From https://otrazhenie.wordpress.com

Are you a Diminisher or a Multiplier, a Genius or a Genius Maker?

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