The sea of emotions

“The sea is emotion incarnate. It loves, hates, and weeps. It defies all attempts to capture it with words and rejects all shackles. No matter what you say about it, there is always that which you can’t.”

Christopher Paolini

From http://siemprefeliz.com

“Emotions are like the sea upon which our ship sails, and we don’t try to control the sea, but instead we control our ship…

Our body is the ship that we are given when we were born, and we can learn more about our body and improve it so that it can sail through life more effectively.

Our mind is the captain of the ship, and we can either have an Ahab or Hook type of captain, or maybe one of the more heroic sea captains, but in any case, it’s up to us to either train or reform our minds to be better leaders and navigators…

Emotions are always flowing, and if it seems like we keep feeling certain emotions over and over, that’s only because we keep guiding our ship in that direction over and over. If we think angry, fearful, or sad thoughts all the time, the sea of emotions we sail through will feel that way…

We’re all sharing the sea of emotions, and we can sail through life however we want. Our work is to navigate our ship in the direction we want to go, exploring the waters, lands, and people that are interesting to us. We don’t need to get bogged down in emotions we don’t enjoy, or engage in naval warfare against someone else. Sometimes we’ll sail together, and sometimes we won’t, but the journey will always be interesting…”

From Getting Better, Man

From http://beinglanterns.com

Have a wonderful journey

🙂

THE END

Jealousy: cure that disease to save your love

From http://izquotes.com

“People commonly take blatant jealousy to be a sign of true affection and commitment. “Isn’t that sweet?” they might say. “He’s trying so hard to protect your relationship. He must really care.”

Well, not so fast. Jealousy is a sign all right — but what it points to is trouble ahead.

Jealousy in Relationships
From http://www.thehavenhealingcentre.co.uk

Here are three reasons why:

Jealousy signals a lack of confidence in oneself:

If you are certain that everyone your partner meets through the day is smarter, wittier, better-looking, and more fun than you — and therefore a threat to steal away your beloved — that is strong incentive to keep him or her on a short leash. Limiting exposure to potential competitors becomes a high-stakes battle for relationship survival — or so you think.

The truth is, no amount of pouty possessiveness will keep you safe. In fact, it is far more likely to damage your relationship than any of your so-called shortcomings. The best defense? Get to work on your self-esteem. 😉

From http://www.rottenecards.com

Jealousy signals a lack of trust in one’s partner.

No one reaches adulthood without suffering a broken heart along the way. That means we each carry around a bucket full of painful memories. We sift it for clues as to what went wrong and strategies for preventing a repeat performance. After a hurtful betrayal, trust is the first thing to go and the last to return — even in a brand-new relationship. Jealous behavior is a way of saying, “You must prove you won’t hurt me too. Until then I’m going to watch you very closely.” But it’s impossible for anyone to prove what they won’t do — and unfair to expect them to try. Here’s a better approach: “You are free to be yourself. I will trust you until you give me a reason not to.”

Trust is the glue that holds together any committed, loving relationship. Jealousy is a solvent that corrodes trust, dissolving the bond that keeps two lovers united.


From http://www.pagecovers.com/

Jealousy signals an unhealthy need for control.

Rival lovers aren’t the only thing that can threaten a jealous person. Chances are, a suspicious individual will also seek to limit anything in his partner’s life that doesn’t include him: time spent with friends, family, or pursuing solitary hobbies and interests.

Jealousy is all about trying to restrict, manipulate, and monitor another person’s behavior and choices. Look out if your relationship is increasingly filled with questions such as, “Where were you? Why were you talking to him? Who sent you that text message? You heard from that person on Facebook again?” Insecurity often leads one person to attempt to orchestrate situations to eliminate perceived threats, but this kind of treatment is toxic over the long haul. Indeed, jealous behavior early on may be a harbinger of even tighter control as the relationship progresses.

SnK - Chained Love by RizaLa
From http://rizala.deviantart.com

A relationship thrives on freedom—the freedom for individuals to grow and develop, to be authentic and genuine, to pursue new opportunities. Unfounded jealousy is a stranglehold sure to suffocate any romantic relationship. Want a lasting, healthy love relationship? Make sure both partners have the space, encouragement, and autonomy to be who they are — without someone else watching every breath and movement.”

From http://www.jonathanlockwoodhuie.com

From eHarmony

* * *

Life is one big road with lots of signs.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
 So when you riding through the ruts, don't complicate your mind.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
 Flee from hate, mischief and jealousy.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
 Don't bury your thoughts, put your vision to reality.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
Wake Up and Live!  - Bob Marley

From http://izquotes.com

Wake up and Live ! 😉

THE END

GREAT DREAM to happier living

 Happiness-quotesFrom How to find happiness

Everyone’s path to happiness is different, but the evidence suggests that the following Ten Keys consistently tend to have a positive impact on people’s happiness and well-being:

  1. Giving:
    Giving is good for you. When we give to others it activates the areas of the brain associated with pleasure, social connection and trust. Altruistic behaviour releases endorphins in the brain and boosts happiness for us as well as the people we help.
  2. Relating:
    People with strong and broad social relationships are happier, healthier and live longer. Close relationships with family and friends provide love, meaning, support and increase our feelings of self worth. Broader networks bring a sense of belonging.
  3. Exercising:
    Our body and our mind are connected. Being active makes us happier as well as being good for our physical health. It instantly improves our mood and can even lift us out of a depression. We don’t all need to run marathons – there are simple things we can all do to be more active each day. And we can also boost our well-being by unplugging from technology, getting outside and – importantly – making sure we get enough sleep!
  4. Appreciating:
    Ever felt there must be more to life? Well good news, there is! And it’s right here in front of us. We just need to stop and take notice. Learning to be more mindful and aware can do wonders for our well-being in all areas of life – like our walk to work, the way we eat or our relationships. It helps us get in tune with our feelings and stops us dwelling on the past or worrying about the future – so we get more out of the day-to-day.
  5. Trying out:
    Learning affects our well-being in lots of positive ways. It exposes us to new ideas and helps us stay curious and engaged. It also gives us a sense of accomplishment and helps boost our self-confidence and resilience. There are many ways to learn new things – not just through formal qualifications. We can share a skill with friends, join a club, learn to sing, play a new sport and so much more.
  6. Direction:
    Feeling good about the future is important for our happiness. We all need goals to motivate us and these need to be challenging enough to excite us, but also achievable. If we try to attempt the impossible this brings unnecessary stress. Choosing ambitious but realistic goals gives our lives direction and brings a sense of accomplishment and satisfaction when we achieve them.
  7. Resilience:
    All of us have times of stress, loss, failure or trauma in our lives. But how we respond to these has a big impact on our wellbeing. We often cannot choose what happens to us, but in principle we can choose our own attitude to what happens. In practice it’s not always easy, but one of the most exciting findings from recent research is that resilience, like many other life skills, can be learned.
  8. Emotions:
    Positive emotions – like joy, gratitude, contentment, inspiration, and pride – are not just great at the time. Recent research shows that regularly experiencing them creates an ‘upward spiral’, helping to build our resources. So although we need to be realistic about life’s ups and downs, it helps to focus on the good aspects of any situation – the glass half full rather than the glass half empty.
  9. Acceptance:
    No-one’s perfect. But so often we compare our insides to other people’s outsides. Dwelling on our flaws – what we’re not rather than what we’ve got – makes it much harder to be happy. Learning to accept ourselves, warts and all, and being kinder to ourselves when things go wrong, increases our enjoyment of life, our resilience and our well-being. It also helps us accept others as they are.
  10. Meaning:
    People who have meaning and purpose in their lives are happier, feel more in control and get more out of what they do. They also experience less stress, anxiety and depression. But where do we find ‘meaning and purpose’? It might be our religious faith, being a parent or doing a job that makes a difference. The answers vary for each of us but they all involve being connected to something bigger than ourselves.

All together, these ten keys are sure to turn your life into a
GREAT DREAM 🙂

Dream
From 10 keys to happier living

Research also shows that a key component of happiness is a sense of control over your life. So pick up these keys, get in charge of your life and free yourself from the cage of unhappiness. Remember, the light can be found in even the darkest places.


THE END