Caregiver Stress and Burnout

Caregiver

While caring for a loved one can be very rewarding, it also involves many stressors. And since caregiving is often a long-term challenge, the emotional impact can snowball over time. You may face years or even decades of caregiving responsibilities. It can be particularly disheartening when there’s no hope that your family member will get better or if, despite your best efforts, their condition is gradually deteriorating.

If the stress of caregiving is left unchecked, it can take a toll on your health, relationships, and state of mind—eventually leading to burnout, a state of emotional, mental, and physical exhaustion. And when you get to that point, both you and the person you’re caring for suffer.

That’s why taking care of yourself isn’t a luxury, it’s a necessity. Cultivating your own emotional and physical well-being is just as important as making sure your family member gets to their doctor’s appointment or takes their medication on time.

Learning to recognize the signs of caregiver stress and burnout is important, so you can take immediate action to prevent things from becoming worse and start improving the situation for both you and the person you’re caring for.

Caregiver

Feeling powerless is the number one contributor to burnout and depression. And it’s an easy trap to fall into as a caregiver, especially if you feel stuck in a role you didn’t expect or helpless to change things for the better. But no matter the situation, you aren’t powerless. This is especially true when it comes to your state of mind. You can’t always get the extra time, money, or physical assistance you’d like, but you can always get more happiness and hope.

Practice acceptance. Try to avoid the emotional trap of feeling sorry for yourself or searching for someone to blame.

Embrace your caregiving choice. Acknowledge that, despite any resentments or burdens you feel, you have made a conscious choice to provide care.

Look for the silver lining. Think about the ways caregiving has made you stronger or how it’s brought you closer to the person you’re taking care of or to other family members.

Don’t let caregiving take over your life. Invest in things that give you meaning and purpose whether it’s your family, church, a favorite hobby, or your career.

Focus on the things you can control. Rather than stressing out over things you can’t control, focus on how you choose to react to problems.

Celebrate the small victories. If you start to feel discouraged, remind yourself that all your efforts matter.

Share your feelings. The simple act of expressing what you’re going through can be very cathartic.

Prioritize activities that bring you enjoyment. Make regular time for hobbies that bring you happiness, whether it’s reading, working in the garden, tinkering in your workshop, knitting, playing with the dogs, or watching the game.

Make yourself laugh. Laughter is an excellent antidote to stress—and a little goes a long way. Whenever you can, try to find the humor in everyday situations.

Get out of the house. Seek out friends, family, and respite care providers to step in with caregiving so you can have some time away from the home.

Maintain your personal relationships. Don’t let your friendships get lost in the shuffle of caregiving.

From Caregiver Stress and Burnout

Caring

Credits:

When we get old…

Age.jpg
“Around the corner, I met Anne Braveman, seventy-nine, and Rita Kahn, eighty-six, who told me they had gone to the movies the week before. It wasn’t some official, prearranged group outing. It was just two friends who decided they wanted to go see The King’s Speech on a Thursday night… A nursing assistant had to agree to join them. Braveman was paralyzed from the waist down due to multiple sclerosis and got around by motorized wheelchair; Kahn was prone to falls and needed a walker. They had to pay the $15 fare for a wheelchair-accessible vehicle to take them. But it was possible for them to go. They were looking forward to watching Sex and the City on DVD next.

“Have you read Fifty Shades of Grey yet?” Kahn asked me, impishly.

I allowed, modestly, that I had not.

“I had never heard of chains and that stuff,” she said, marvelling. Had I? she wanted to know.

I really didn’t want to answer that…”

(from Being Mortal by Atul Gawande)

We do not stop having fun when we get old.
We get old when we stop having fun…

THE END

Credits: Image from searchgi.com

Never stop having funnnnn…

b9067-funny_old_people_38

There are two types of people
You’ll find in this world;
Those that grow young,
And those that grow old.
The old growing type,
Are not very much fun,
They become quite inactive,
Avoiding hot sun.
They complain of misfortunes
Like bad backs and poor stocks,
And soon they need help
With their food and their socks.
But the young growing type
Are a different affair,
They grow ever more fun,
Despite sticks and grey hair.
No longer tied down
To their work every day,
They see their retirement
As a great time to play.
They jet off on adventures,
And plan fun-filled days,
And never become
At all set in their ways.

By PookyH

Play
Life is too short to be normal.
Stay weird and never stop having funnnn….

😜

THE END

Credits:

Image 1 from http://pattilousquilts.blogspot.co.nz

How old do you choose to be today?

mirrorfrom Acceptance

Age is a fascinating concept. When I was 17, I felt more like a 100 year old. However closer I get to a 100, more I feel like a 17 year old.

As psychologists note, chronologically, you may be 30, 40, 50,  60 or 70 years of age, based on when you were born. There is no arguing that unless you’ve embraced some new alternative way of doing math. The real question is how old do you feel – what is your psychological age?

Your psychological age is determined by you, not anyone or anything else, so you can actually feel as young as you want. You may think you should act a certain age, but that is more than likely your desire to fit into some conventional notion of how a person of your age should act. Regardless of how you feel right now, recognize that you have within you the ability to change how old you feel today.

So how old do you choose to be today?

EsteemFrom White Ribbon Day New Zealand

THE END